• The number of active telephone lines in Nigeria increased from 162,058,918 in September to 165,239,443 in October 2018, according to the NCC. This is an increase of 3,180,525. Of the active numbers, the GSM communication network recorded 164,865,417 lines, an increase of 3,179,670, while CDMA operators saw 126,032 active subscribers in October, a decrease of 237 from the 126,269 customers seen in September. Fixed Wireless Networks retained the 26,865 subscribers seen in September, while Fixed Wired networks lost 1,796 to drop to 108,997 active users in October. VOIP operators had 112,132 active users in October, an increase of 2,888 subscribers.
  • The FG has ordered vice-chancellors of striking public universities across the country to enforce “no-work-no-pay” rule on the striking lecturers. The directive is to implement the “no work, no pay” policy as communicated to the universities in a memo sent by the Nigerian Universities Commission to university vice-chancellors. The Academic Staff Union of Universities has been on an indefinite, nationwide strike over non-implementation of previous agreements by the FG since November 4, and are demanding for increased university funding.
  • A research paper by the Global System for Mobile Association shows that the mobile technology ecosystem generated $1.8 billion (₦657 billion) revenue in form of taxes to the Nigerian government in 2017. The GSMA’s findings indicated that the total tax contribution of the mobile ecosystem in the year under review was equivalent to 16 percent of government tax revenue. The report also said the mobile ecosystem accounted for 5.5 percent of the country’s GDP in the same year, $21 billion. Finally, the report stated that the business activities of operators in the GSM industry had also created 500,000 jobs for Nigerians. The mobile ecosystem is made up of original equipment manufacturers, the mobile network operators, the content and infrastructure providers and other support services providers.
  • Oil marketers have given the FG a seven-day ultimatum to settle outstanding debts totalling ₦800 billion, failing which depots would cease operation across the country. The marketers, comprising Major Oil Marketers Association of Nigeria, Depot and Petroleum Products Marketers Association and Independent Petroleum Products Importers, said failure to meet the deadline would force its members to disengage workers from depots. Patrick Etim, legal adviser to IPPI, told the News Agency of Nigeria that banks have taken over investments and assets of oil marketers over unpaid debts. According to Etim, marketers have no choice that to ask their workers to stay at home over unpaid salary arrears due to huge subsidy debts owed by the government.